Cod and chickpea curry

6 May

Cod and chickpea curry

Cod and chickpeas are trusted companions, appearing together in Spanish, Italian and North African dishes.

They work well in this simple Indian curry too – standing their ground against the sharpness and spice of the sauce.

Cod and chickpea curry
(serves 4)

  • 1 Tb sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 Tb curry powder
  • a thumb of ginger, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tins chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tin chickpeas, drained
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 cod fillets
  • fresh coriander and lemon wedges, to serve
  1. Heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium flame.
  2. Add the mustard seeds. As soon as they start popping, add the onion. Cook until softened.
  3. Stir in the curry powder, then add the ginger and garlic. Cook a few minutes more.
  4. Add the tomatoes, then the chickpeas and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper and cook for about ten minutes or until thickened.
  5. Nestle the cod fillets into the tomato sauce, then cover the pan with a lid. Lower the heat and leave to simmer for another ten minutes, or until the cod is cooked through.
  6. Serve over basmati rice, with a scattering of coriander and a wedge of lemon.

Sweet potato, chorizo and red pepper

2 May


Sweet potato, red pepper and chorizo tossed in a simple vinaigrette is a very satisfying combination of ingredients.

I usually serve it as a simple, weekday dinner over couscous, but it also works nicely as a warm salad. Continue reading

Singapore rice noodles

28 Apr

Singapore noodles

It’s an ambition to cook a dish from every country in the world – a sort of travel by fork.

So I was disappointed to learn that my long-time favourite Singapore noodles won’t earn me my Singapore stamp. Turns out they are a Cantonese creation, and probably originated in Hong Kong.

I certainly ate them regularly when I lived in Vancouver and worked a short walk from Chinatown.  Continue reading

Tuna melt

24 Apr

tuna melt

Whenever I eat a tuna melt it takes me back to my childhood in northern BC.

One of my first friends had parents who belonged to the Royal Order of Elks. My parents weren’t remotely interested in joining clubs, but it looked pretty good to my young eyes.

Her parents got to march in the parade in bright purple jackets. And there were social events, like the summer barbeque or children’s Christmas party that I’d attend as her guest.

But what I liked best about the Elks was going to the lodge.

Continue reading

Tataki kyuri (smashed cucumber salad)

20 Apr

tataki kyuri

I tried this chilled cucumber salad at a Japanese pop-up kitchen the other day, and was intrigued both by the texture and the depth of flavour.

Turns out giving the cucumbers a few whacks with a rolling pin before dressing them is the secret. Continue reading

Cream of cauliflower soup

5 Mar

cream of cauliflower soup

This cream of cauliflower soup has the silkiest texture. I sometimes omit the cream– replacing it with more milk – and it still comes out rich and smooth.

Horseradish combines beautifully with cauliflower. Along with the lemon juice, it adds a bit of heat and brightness to the mix. Continue reading

Broccoli spread

28 Feb

confit broccoli

I wasn’t sure what to call this broccoli concoction…

It started out as broccoli confit, but I’ve cut so much on the oil that the name no longer fits. I thought of broccamole, but decided the lack of avocados ruled that one out.

Patés are too smooth, dips are for dipping. Which led me to “spread” – so broccoli spread it is.

Whatever the name, it’s very moreish stuff. I serve it as an appetiser on toasted sourdough or crackers. I also eat it with a spoon straight out of the fridge. Continue reading